Algae Maze Converts Sewage into Green Oil and Gas

Share On Stumble
algae maze

Algae-laden canals have the potential to provide an efficient means of treating human effluent while simultaneously transforming it into a green source of energy.

While algae has been used to treat human waste since time immemorial, and efforts to convert its biomass into energy commenced as early as the 1940s, an environmental engineer in California is now working on a system which pairs the two processes, thus achieving cost efficiencies which could give the algal fuels industry a viable future.

 Tryg Lungquist

Tryg Lungquist

Tryg Lundquist, an associate professor in environmental engineering at the California State Polytechnic University, has spent more than two decades designing sewage “raceway” systems and says the technology is now cheap and efficient enough to serve as a viable means of both treating waste water and manufacturing biofuel.

Lundquist’s system consists of an intricate, maze-like network of shallow canals and looping ponds designed to foster the growth of algae colonies by maximizing their exposure to sunlight and aeration.

Paddle wheels impel the movement of waste water which enters the system, mixing it with the algae as it proceeds through the network of raceways.

According to Lundquist, this system harbours major advantages compared to existing methods for the treatment of sewage and waste water. It is inexpensive to build and operate, particularly compared to prevailing mechanical systems which can be costly and energy-intensive. The algae-based treatment process entails less use of electricity, and permits the recycling of water as well as nitrogen and phosphorus.

On top of reduced costs and heightened energy efficiency, the process also provides the added boon of biofuel in the form of the algal colonies. The system, purpose tailored to facilitate algae growth, generates sufficient biomass to make conversion into fuels such as algal oil economically feasible.

According to estimates made by Dr David Batten, a former scientist with CSIRO’s Energy Flagship and currently an industrial ecologist with the Temaplan Group, algal oil can be made via conversion from waste water for under US$160 per barrel, or US$1 per litre. Even in a country with a relatively modest population like Australia, the use of sewage-derived algal fuel could replace as much as 10 per cent of current diesel use.

Despite his long-term commitment to the new processing method, Lundquist concedes it suffers from a few disadvantages, the large amount of land required to house the maze-like networks of raceways being it chief shortcoming. This land must also be situated in close proximity to treatment plants in order to ensure that electricity and transportation costs remain low, while suitable climate conditions are also required to spur algae growth.

For these reasons, the method may not be suitable for high-density urban environments, or in countries with cold climates and modest sunlight. In the antipodean nations of Australia and New Zealand, however, which enjoy strong levels of sunlight as well as ample space, the system could certainly abet efforts to transition to green sources of energy.

A waste water treatment centre in the New Zealand town of Cambridge is already conducting trials of a full-scale raceway system, which will be permanently incorporated into the centre’s treatment process should it prove successful.

large-algae-pond

CONTRIBUTED BY:


Marc Howe covers developments in the energy, mining and infrastructure sectors for Sourceable. He worked as a technical translator and business journalist in China throughout the noughties, but has since returned to Australia and is currently based in his hometown of Canberra....

SHARE

Share On Stumble

Comments

 characters available
  1. Kevin says:

    So at best it can do less than $160/bbl, in ideal circumstances. That is a long way from being economically viable.

  2. Kara Serenius says:

    From previous discussions, it seemed the limiting factor is the concentration of the biomass and removal of water from the algae as they are biological entities, they contain largely water. Has anyone seen any recent research on this?

  3. Lynndon Harnell says:

    I did see an article of TV that UQ and UWA are also developing this.

  4. Graham Moore says:

    Algae as a source of fuel has received quite a bit of attention over the last decade, but I have never seen anyone address the basic energy balance of the system. In Australia the average solar energy at ground level is just few hundred W/m2. Photosynthesis by algae can trap about 3% of this power.

    So at 10 W/m2 you need a a very large amount of land area to capture a useful amount of energy, and unless the algae is contained to prevent water evaporation a lot of water to run it all. If one observes typical waste water treatment plants that use land application for their final treatment the land area used is usually quite modest. For example a domestic septic tank drain field might be a 200 m2, giving the possibility of 2 kW total from the algae. This is not very attractive compared to 10 PV panels, covering 15 m2.


advertisement

More Engineering

Guidelines Needed to Improve HVAC Energy Efficiency

hvac

A new study by the National Institute of Standards... Buildings

Businesses Decry ‘Shambolic’ Quality of NBN

nbn

The scathing comments of businesses that have connected to... Infrastructure

New Report Indicates NSW Gas May Go to Qld

Narrabri gas project

A controversial coal seam gas project in northern NSW... Energy

advertisement