Sydney Skyscraper Named One of CTBUH’s Best Tall Buildings 3

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Thursday, June 26th, 2014
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Sydney’s One Central Park has been named as one of the four best buildings in the world for 2014 by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

The 117-metre residential skyscraper will vie against three other buildings for the title of the Best Tall Building Worldwide at the CTBUH 13th Annual Awards Symposium later this year.

The other nominees include:

  • The Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, Portland, USA (Americas)
  • De Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands (Europe)
  • Cayan Tower, Dubai, UAE (Middle East & Africa)

The four winners were chosen from a total of 88 entrants worldwide.

This year’s entries featured a number of buildings for which designers implemented greenery at sky-high levels – most notably One Central Park, which features a public park, a lush canopy and greenery embedded in the architecture in the form of the world’s tallest vertical garden.The vertical garden, created by Patrick Blanc, makes use of hydroponics and heliostats.

A series of renovation projects also impressed the judges, including the Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building Portland. The 18-storey tower was transformed from an outdated 1874 commercial building to one that now meets LEED standards and the energy and water conservation requirements of the Energy Independence & Security Act (EISA). 

Additionally “new horizons in form were pushed aggressively, yielding towers in ‘wheel’ or ‘doughnut’ shape and playing off proximity to water,” according to the CTBUH.

Cayan Tower, Dubai UAE

Cayan Tower, Dubai UAE © Tim Griffith

Cayan Tower in Dubai ias the world’s tallest twister tower. Designed by SOM, Cayan Tower was inspired by the structure of human DNA and features open space architecture concepts, removing the need for any pillars within the building.

MAD Architects, renowned for unconventional structures, earned a nod with the Sheraton Tai Lake Resort in Huzhou. Aesthetically described as a ring shape, the building rises 100 metres and spans 116 metres wide.

Australia’s 8 Chifley Street in Sydney, a commercial skyscraper by Richard Rogers of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and the Lippmann Partnership, also wowed the judges. According to the official building website, the “building (is) defined by its revolutionary office layout concept. Comprising seven unique vertical villages ranging in size from 1,800 to 2,880 square metres, single floors are interspersed between each high-rise village to allow for flexibility and growth.”

“The submissions this year reflect the incredible diversity of tall buildings being built around the world,” said Jeanne Gang, awards jury chair and founding principal of Studio Gang Architects. “Even more so, they reflect the dawning of a global recognition that tall buildings have a critical role to play in a rapidly changing climate and urban environment.”

MAD's Sheraton Tai Lake Resort in Huzhou is a finalist

MAD’s Sheraton Tai Lake Resort in Huzhou

The CTBUH Best Tall Building Awards are an independent review of new skyscraper projects and are judged by a panel of industry experts. According to the Council, “projects are recognised for making an extraordinary contribution to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and for achieving sustainability at the broadest level.”

Last year, the CCTV Headquarters in Beijing was awarded the  Best Tall Building Worldwide award. Designed by architects Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, it features two tilting towers that meet at a 75-metre high cantilever above an open centre.

“The CCTV building is the type of building that may not happen again,” Gang said last year. “It is an incredible achievement. In terms of structural engineering and iconography; in some ways it is like the Eiffel Tower of our time.”

Last Years Winner: The CCTV Building in Beijing

Last year’s winner: The CCTV Building in Beijing

In the coming weeks, the CTBUH will unveil the winners of the The 10-Year, Urban Habitat, Lifetime Achievement, Building Performance and Innovation awards.

The Tall Building Winners and Finalists in each category are listed below:

Americas:
Winner – Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, Portland, USA
Finalist – The Point, Guayaquil, Ecuador
Finalist – United Nations Secretariat Building, New York, USA

One Central Park's Vertical Garden

One Central Park’s Vertical Garden

Asia & Australasia:
Winner – One Central Park, Sydney, Australia
Finalist – 8 Chifley Street, Sydney, Australia
Finalist – Abeno Harukas, Osaka, Japan
Finalist – Ardmore Residence, Singapore
Finalist – FKI Tower, Seoul, South Korea
Finalist – Ideo Morph 38, Bangkok, Thailand
Finalist – Sheraton Tai Lake Resort, Huzhou, China
Finalist – The Interlace, Singapore
Finalist – The Jockey Club Innovation Tower, Hong Kong, China
Finalist – Wangjing SOHO, Beijing, China

Europe:
Winner – De Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands
Finalist – DC Tower, Vienna, Austria
Finalist – NEO Bankside, London, UK

Middle East & Africa:
Winner – Cayan Tower, Dubai, UAE

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3
  1. Grant Spork

    One Central Park, looks like something out of a dystopian brutalist vision.
    A massive monolith, with almost no sculptural or form quality, that would be a huge problem in terms of diverting wind forces onto other buildings. This is about the a complete void in design, why would this possibly be considered to have any merit?

  2. Ben Burdett

    Not a fan. I think it looks dreary.

  3. David Chandler

    Angela, what the selection criteria here? I have found that mostly these judging processes are more about a beauty contest than they are about value for money and actual living amenity. While there are initial claims of green credentials and current design fads the proof will be in the story 5 years from now. During the BER schools program designers awarded themselves great accolades for a few bespoke designs like those in the CTBUH Awards. But no mention of cost compared to equally functional alternatives involving more appropriate uses of valuable public investment. The designer schools cost nearly double the cost of their peers. How will some of these buildings fare in the future? What will their maintenance and operation costs be?